Foss for Days

I’ve posted a few segments devoted to Iceland’s legendary falls (or foss).  What was even more amazing were some of the throwaway falls pictured below, many not even bothered by a name, which were still world class in the their own right.  

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The Blue Lagoon, Church Mountain and the original Geysir

A collection of images from around some of Iceland’s biggest tourist destinations.  The Blue Lagoon, a spa and pools filled with mineral rich runoff from the geothermal plant, Svartsengi.  Kirkjufell, Icelandic for Church Mountain for obviously reasons and from Geysir, the original namesake of geysers worldwide (although the images below are of Strokkur, an adjacent geyser which routinely erupts in heights up to 100 ft!)  The actual Geysir is infrequent, and may often go dormant for years at a time.  I visited this spot three times trying to get the right light, and over those days never once saw it erupt.  But fortunately, Strokkur goes off every 15 minutes or so I had plenty of action to capture… 

Glacial Lagoons – Jokulsárlón and Fjallsárlón

A collection of images from the glacial outlet lagoons on Iceland’s southside, where calving faces of the Vatnajokull glaciers dump their ice into the ocean.  Although it looks like a frozen landscape, it is ever changing, with the light and land looking drastically every time I visited.  I love sitting around here at night, watching auroras dance over head and sounds loud as thundering from icebergs rolling and crashing into one another.  This place has been on my bucket list since childhood, but its still on there because I’m going to have to go back!

Winds so strong you could stand at a 45 degree angle to the ground!  
Ice arches under the green glow of an overcast aurora.
Ice swirling around as the tides come in.
Volcano’s glow high up on the ice shelf.  

Winter Is Coming

This post is all about putting the ice in Iceland.  Never have I seen such crazy snowstorms in all my life.  While in the north near Akureyri, I got caught in a blizzard and was stuck in whiteout conditions for days.  While most of the first day was spent digging my car out of a ditch i9 careened into, I braved the cold and managed to make the most of it.  After the storms had passed, it was a whole new world, where what had been verdant hills days ago was now white stretching to the horizon.  Glad I brought my snow shoes, because a few times when I went out without them I ended up buried chest deep after falling through snow banks.  Anyway, it was brutal out there, so I hope you enjoy!  

Land of Fire

Iceland is a diverse and ever changing landscape of volcanic activity.  Five geothermal plants generate a vast majority of the country’s heating and power need. The land is also rancid with volcanic features, such as fumaroles, hot springs, and the original geyser, Geysir. The red skies in some of the images below comes from the eruption of the Bárðarbunga volcano high up on the Vatnajökull, Iceland’s largest glacier.